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The initial human settlement of Georgia took place during one of the most dramatic periods of climate change in recent earth history, toward the end of the Ice Age, in the Late Pleistocene epoch.

Exactly when human beings first arrived is currently unknown, although people had to have been present 13,250 years ago: distinctive artifacts of the Clovis culture (so named from the New Mexico town of Clovis, where the characteristic stone projectile points with a central groove were first unearthed) have been found at a number of locations across the state.

The very first Olympic events were freestyle (crawl) or breaststroke. In the 1940s, breaststrokers discovered that they could go faster by bringing both arms forward over their heads.

Surface finds of Paleoindian artifacts, many in private collections, still constitute the bulk of the evidence for Paleoindian occupations in Georgia. O'Steen, "Paleoindian Period Archaeology of Georgia," Georgia Archaeological Research Design Paper 6, Laboratory of Archaeology Series Report 28 (University of Georgia, Athens, 1990). Anderson et al., "Paleoindian and Early Archaic in the Lower Southeast: A View from Georgia," in Ocmulgee Archaeology, 1936-1986, ed.

Several hundred Paleoindian points are currently known from the state, although the number is tiny compared with the tens of thousands of later points that have been found.

By the close of the Paleoindian Period, around 9000 or 8000 B. C.), however, did southern pine communities and extensive riverine cypress swamps begin to emerge in the Coastal Plain. The three major subperiods presumably coincide with human populations, those who initially explored and settled the region (Early Paleoindian), established regional population concentrations and cultural variants (Middle Paleoindian), and finally, adapted to modern conditions (Late Paleoindian).

C., sea level was within a few meters of its present elevation, and climate and biota approached modern conditions. Most likely, Paleoindians moved over large areas, on foot or by water, in small bands of twenty-five to fifty people.

Prehistoric man learnt to swim in order to cross rivers and lakes – we know this because cave paintings from the Stone Age depicting swimmers have been found in Egypt. Swimming was not widely practised until the early 19th century, when the National Swimming Society of Great Britain began to hold competitions.